Is it true that sexually transmitted diseases are not transmitted by oral intercourse?

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Is it true that sexually transmitted diseases are not transmitted by oral intercourse?

Oral intercourse also presents a risk of transmission of sexual diseases due to contact between sperm, vaginal fluids or the anus and the mucous membrane of the mouth.

Many people are convinced that, by having only oral intercourse, they are protected from sexually transmitted infections - this is another false myth!
It is true that this type of intercourse presents a lower risk of contagion than vaginal or anal contagion, but HIV or syphilis, for example, can be transmitted through contact of the mucous membrane of the mouth with sperm or vaginal fluids.
This risk increases in case of small wounds or lesions (even not visible to the naked eye) on the genitals or in the mouth, or in case of gingival alterations or bleeding. In these cases the sperm or vaginal fluid come into direct contact with the wounds and the microorganisms can more easily infect the subjects involved in oral intercourse. Other sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, hepatitis B, "genital herpes and" papilloma virus infection, can also spread by practicing oral sex through the same mechanisms described above.
In particular, if the papilloma virus infects the mouth or throat, it can cause lesions which, if not diagnosed and treated, can develop over time into cancer of the mouth, neck or pharynx.
Contact between the anus and the mucous membrane of the mouth can also lead to the transmission of fecal-oral infections such as hepatitis A. For all these reasons, this sexual practice is certainly not to be considered safe, especially if performed with partners who have not performed a screening. complete for sexually transmitted infections.
Also during this practice it is therefore important to use protective methods, such as condoms or dental dams (very thin latex sheets) which prevent contact between sperm, vaginal fluids, blood and the mucous membrane of the mouth.

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Separating facts from fiction. Protect yourself. Protect others

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Ways HIV can be transmitted

3. D’Souza G, Kreimer AR, Viscidi R, Pawlita M, Fakhry C, Koch WM, Westra WH, Gillison ML. Case-control study of human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer [Summary]. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2007; 356 : 1.944-56

4. United Against AIDS (ISS)

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